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CASE REPORT
Year : 2015  |  Volume : 5  |  Issue : 1  |  Page : 61-64

Type II dens evaginatus of maxillary central incisor: An alternative approach


1 Department of Restorative Dental Science, Endodontics, College of Dentistry, College of Dentistry, National Guard Health Affairs, King Saud bin Abdulaziz University for Health Sciences, Riyadh; Department of Endodontics, College of Dentistry, National Guard Health Affairs, King Saud bin Abdulaziz University for Health Sciences, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia
2 Department of Endodontics, Resident, Saudi Endodonic Board, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia
3 Department of Restorative Dental Science, Endodontics, College of Dentistry, National Guard Health Affairs, King Saud bin Abdulaziz University for Health Sciences, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia
4 Department of Endodontics, College of Dentistry, National Guard Health Affairs, King Saud bin Abdulaziz University for Health Sciences, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia

Correspondence Address:
Mansour Alrejaie
Diplomate, American Board of Endodontics Assistant Professor, KSAU-HS College of Dentistry, Division Head, NGHA-Endodontics, Riyadh
Saudi Arabia
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/1658-5984.149093

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Dens evaginatus is the developmental anomaly of tooth that exhibits protrusion of a tubercle from occlusal surfaces of premolar, and lingual surfaces of maxillary central incisor and lateral incisors. Dens evaginatus is common in Caucasian population. Saudi Arabia is also well evidenced of such cases. These tubercles have an enamel layer covering dentin core containing a thin extension of pulp. These cusp-like protrusions are susceptible to pulp exposure from wear or fracture because of malocclusion. Type II dens evaginatus involves normal pulp with immature root apex. Materials to enhance the pulpal recession or pulpotomy procedures indicated in such cases require long time and efforts to ensure pulpal recession or root maturity, respectively. Also prolonged treatment has risk of fracture of the cusp and reinfection and requires patient commitment for the follow-up procedures. Present case describes the use of mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) in type II dens evaginatus of maxillary central incisor.


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